Infinity Blue Barramundi committed to a sustainable future

Committing to improving the health of our oceans and planet

Date: 16 | 6 | 21
Written by: admin

The world’s largest Barramundi hatchery now powered by nature.

MainStream Aquaculture are pleased to announce that we have taken another step towards becoming a completely sustainable farm by switching over to a 100% renewable electricity provider.

In an agreement with Momentum Energy, MainStream Aquaculture will now source all of the Werribee farm’s power from the Tasmania-based Granville Harbour Wind Farm. Our Werribee based Barramundi farm is already reducing our carbon footprint by growing our Barramundi in geothermally heated spring water, thus eliminating the need to power water heaters.

Located on the windy west coast of Tasmania, the Granville Harbour Wind Farm is home to 31 wind turbines, with the ability to produce up to 112 megawatts of clean, renewable energy a year – enough to power 46,000 homes!

For more insights on the positive impacts of aquaculture on the health of our environment, you can listen to Dr. Harrison’s interview with Loren Botica on the Monash Tech School Podcast or read it below.

Dr Paul Harrison discusses the health of our oceans on the Monash Tech School Podcast

“There is a lot we need to do to make the ocean better.“

Host Loren Botica of the Monash Tech School podcast interviews Doctor Paul Harrison, Marine biologist, Chief scientist and co-founder of MainStream Aquaculture, along with Professor Richard Reina and Sue Graham on the health of our oceans.

They cover the ever changing health of the ocean, how this diagnosis affects our lives and how technology can help revive these great expanses of water. Doctor Harrison also details the positive impacts that aquaculture can have on oceans and wild fish stocks.

According to Professor Reina, “change is always happen, but it is the rate of change that is the most significant and worrying factor”.

It is this change and damage in the oceans that Mainstream Aquaculture is committed to slowing, allowing these expansive ecosystems to regenerate. Doctor Harrison states that MainStream Aquaculture’s mission is to ultimately, “feed the world with high quality fish and supply it in a sustainable and environmental way”

As populations and demand for protein continue to increase, if we continue to wild catch our fish, it’s not sustainable, it won’t last

Dr. Paul Harrison, Marine biologist, Chief scientist & co-founder of MainStream Aquaculture

Dr. Paul Harrison, Marine biologist, Chief scientist & co-founder of MainStream Aquaculture

“As populations and demand for protein continue to increase, if we continue to wild catch our fish, it’s not sustainable, it won’t last.”

The efficiencies and benefits of aquaculture on the natural environment were also listed by Dr. Harrison. In particular, “the main advantage is that it takes a lot of pressure off of wild fisheries. Aquaculture allows us to provide fish as food without stripping the oceans bare”

Dr Harrison goes on to add that “There is a lot we need to do to make the ocean better. Population growth has gone far enough along that we may never get back to what it was when there were less people around. But the ocean can still be a great and healthy environment”

To listen to the full discussion, the podcast can be accessed via Spotify or on a web browser.

The future of seafood is about truly sustainable production

By the year 2100, it is estimated that there will be 11 billion people on earth. Currently, we are at 7.2 billion, and there are already nearly 1 billion people who are chronically hungry every day.

Being smart about how we produce our food will be a vital in the years to come.  There are exciting breakthroughs on the horizon such as the development of drought-resistant crops, but it’s clear that if we use un-sustainable farming practices today, there will be no resource to use for tomorrow.

Aquaculture is leading the way in the efficient production of protein. By breeding fish with better food conversion ratio’s (the amount of feed required to produce 1 kg of fish), faster growth rates, and higher survival in managed systems, the impact on the environment compared to wild-catch is significantly decreased.  Small land footprints and low water use are other vital sustainability attributes.

In the case of Infinity Blue Springwater Barramundi, we draw naturally heated water from an underground aquifer, which means we have pristine water without heating costs. And because the water is salty, it cannot be used to grow crops.  But wait there’s more: because we can control all our inputs and outputs, we capture our waste to produce an organic fertilizer!

This is a great example of utilising a resource effectively, and sustainably. So if you want a fish that is not only good for you, but good for the planet and our future food security, choose Infinity Blue Barramundi.